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Water hardness influenced variations in reproductive potential of two freshwater fish species; Poecilia reticulata and Betta splendens.

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    • Abstract:
      Objective: Hardness of water in the form of CaCO3 affects reproductive potential in various fish species, differently. This study evaluates the effect of water hardness on growth and reproduction of two aquarium fishes, Poecilia reticulata (Ovo-viviparous sp.) and Betta splendens (Oviparous sp.) by growing them under 150 (control), 320, 540 and 900 ppm CaCO3 levels in semi natural aquaria. Results: Growth increased with increasing water hardness, reporting a significant progress of P. reticulata (p = 0.005) at 900 ppm. Similarly, the reproductive potential of P. reticulata was improved significantly, recording the highest fecundity (16.22 ± 3.90) and Gonadosomatic Index (GSI-2.48 ± 0.6) at 900 ppm. However, in B. splendens water hardness adversely affected the reproduction by resulting a significantly low hatchability and disturbed bubble nests at 900 ppm, compared to the largest bubble nest formed at the control condition (108.58 ± 16.19 cm2). Thus, the study revealed differential effects of water hardness on reproductive potential of the test species, by increasing the potential of P. reticulata while decreasing that of B. splendens. Though larval survival was affected in both species, larval growth was improved significantly in P. reticulata at 900 ppm level. Understanding reproductive potential of aquarium fishes in natural waters is crucial for their management purposes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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